Edward Lawrie Tatum

Academic

1909 – 1975

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Who was Edward Lawrie Tatum?

Edward Lawrie Tatum was an American geneticist. He shared half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1958 with George Wells Beadle for showing that genes control individual steps in metabolism. The other half of that year's award went to Joshua Lederberg.

Beadle and Tatum's key experiments involved exposing the bread mold Neurospora crassa to x-rays, causing mutations. In a series of experiments, they showed that these mutations caused changes in specific enzymes involved in metabolic pathways. These experiments, published in 1941, led them to propose a direct link between genes and enzymatic reactions, known as the "one gene, one enzyme" hypothesis.

Tatum went on to study genetics in bacteria. An active area of research in his laboratory was to understand the basis of Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. Later, Tatum and his student Joshua Lederberg showed that E. coli could share genetic information through recombination.

Tatum was born in Boulder, Colorado. He attended college at the University of Chicago and received his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1934.

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Born
Dec 14, 1909
Boulder
Also known as
  • Edward Tatum
Nationality
  • United States of America
Education
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
Employment
  • Stanford University
Lived in
  • Boulder
Died
Nov 5, 1975
New York City

Submitted
on July 23, 2013

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