Harriet Beecher Stowe biography

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Novelist, Author

1811 – 1896

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Who was Harriet Beecher Stowe?

Harriet Beecher Stowe was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin was a depiction of life for African Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day.

Famous Quotes:

  • To be really great in little things, to be truly noble and heroic in the insipid details of everyday life, is a virtue so rare as to be worthy of canonization.
  • Everyone confesses in the abstract that exertion which brings out all the powers of body and mind is the best thing for us all; but practically most people do all they can to get rid of it, and as a general rule nobody does much more than circumstances drive them to do.
  • Whipping and abuse are like laudanum: you have to double the dose as the sensibilities decline.
  • One would like to be grand and heroic, if one could; but if not, why try at all? One wants to be very something, very great, very heroic; or if not that, then at least very stylish and very fashionable. It is this everlasting mediocrity that bores me.
  • Nobody had ever instructed him that a slave-ship, with a procession of expectant sharks in its wake, is a missionary institution, by which closely-packed heathen are brought over to enjoy the light of the Gospel.
  • So long as the law considers all these human beings, with beating hearts and living affections, only as so many things belonging to the master -- so long as the failure, or misfortune, or imprudence, or death of the kindest owner, may cause them any day to exchange a life of kind protection and indulgence for one of hopeless misery and toil -- so long it is impossible to make anything beautiful or desirable in the best-regulated administration of slavery.
  • What makes saintliness in my view, as distinguished from ordinary goodness, is a certain quality of magnanimity and greatness of soul that brings life within the circle of the heroic.
  • Home is a place not only of strong affections, but of entire unreserved; it is life's undress rehearsal, its backroom, its dressing room, from which we go forth to more careful and guarded intercourse, leaving behind us much debris of cast-off and everyday clothing.
  • The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone.
  • Mothers are the most instinctive philosophers.

Citation

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"Harriet Beecher Stowe." Biographies.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 13 Jun 2021. <https://www.biographies.net/people/en/harriet_beecher_stowe>.


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Born
Jun 14, 1811
Litchfield
Also known as
  • Harriet Elizabeth Beecher
Parents
Siblings
Spouses
Children
Nationality
  • United States of America
Profession
Lived in
  • Cincinnati
  • Maine
  • Hartford
Died
Jul 1, 1896
Hartford

Submitted
on July 23, 2013

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